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Viewing properties from a feng shui perspective

By David Koh

Land masses have energy. We know this through our understanding of gravitational effect, which is measurable.

Part 1: Landform principles 

Believe it or not, geomancy or feng shui plays a role in economics, especially in the property market. It affects the decisions of prospective buyers.  

However, as feng shui becomes a mainstream practice, many people are jumping on the bandwagon.  

Armed with a couple of books on feng shui from the local bookstore, they set up shop to offer consultancy services.  

We can see over time, how some properties or areas thrived while others stagnated. Human factors undoubtedly play a role but could feng shui also have influenced it? 

Yin & Yang 

Feng shui is generally categorised as Yin and Yang feng shui:  

David Koh: "Over time, some properties or areas thrived while others stagnated".

�Yin refers to burial sites

�Yang is for the homes of the living

Most ancient texts on feng shui are mainly on Yin Feng Shui - there are few on Yang Feng Shui. 

Most texts point out that Yin and Yang Feng Shui have similarities, in terms of landforms, cosmic energy, environmental energy and their effects.  

Nonetheless, there are differences in approach and parameters. A key difference between the two is in identification.  

Yang Feng Shui requires one to identify the subject - the person who will be living in the house - based on his date of birth. Upon identification, the next steps would be to select the ideal location, matching and igniting (or picking the dates to move in). 

With Yin Feng Shui, the sequence is slightly different. Selection of the location comes first, followed by matching and igniting (when the dead will be buried).  

Many practitioners mistakenly think that Yin Feng Shui does not have an identification step. The igniting or selection of the burial date is closely linked to identification.  

Yang Feng Shui requires one to identify the subject � the person who will be living in the house � based on his date of birth.

This last step is akin to giving a "birth date" and time for the dead. 

The living has a prior birth date while the dead is given a new date of "birth". This makes Yin Feng Shui even more important.  

This is because a living person has no choice over his date of birth. With the dead, the deceased's surviving family can choose a specific date for igniting. This date, combined with the proper location, can influence the surviving family's future and those of the generations to come. 

Favourable dates 

Most ancient texts repeatedly mention the importance of picking favourable dates for both Yin and Yang Feng Shui. Favourable dates mean that the day and time should harmonise, enhance and strengthen the selected environment - the house for the living or the dead.  

With this understanding in mind, we can proceed to interpret the ancient texts. Among these tomes, in my opinion, the most important is ancient sage Guo Pu's article, Book of Burial. This book was derived from another sage Qing Wu Tze's Qing Wu, the most ancient, widely recognised and respected text on feng shui.  

Many texts written by authors and sages in later years referred to Qing Wu as their basis. 

Bearing in mind that "ancient technology" is exactly that, we can expect Guo Pu and Qing Wu Tze to describe their observations and findings via analogies.  

An in-depth study of the life and times of these sages is actually required to make sense of their writings. This often discourages many feng shui scholars from taking the trouble. 

According to ancient feng shui texts, the main basis of burial, which is burying the dead, is to tap into living force (�Live Qi").

Live Qi 

We will attempt to translate Guo Pu's text and correlate it to modern knowledge. 

The main basis of burial, which is burying the dead, is to tap into living force ("Live Qi"). In Chinese philosophy, Qi comprises the movement of five elements, namely Water, Wood, Fir, Earth and Metal. These five Live Qi move within the earth's mass and when tapped, would give life to all things. 

The five-element Qi refers to the constituents and nutrients contained within the earth mass. Where the nutrients and constituents are rich, the soil is fertile.  

Likewise, where such constituents are lacking, the soil is infertile. The growth of all living things, from plants, insects and animals to the simplest forms such as algae depends greatly on the fertility of the soil and environment.  

We will not repeat what these five elements are as you are probably very familiar with them by now. 

Human beings obtained their body from their parents and when their deceased parents' body receive Live Qi, their living descendants will likewise benefit from it. 

Based on modern science, we know that decaying organic matter - including human remains - emit radiation. Carbon dating technology was developed based on this principle. Thus, decomposition of human remains - carbon and calcium - generates alpha, beta and gamma energy. Alpha and beta radiation are very weak and cannot travel far. They are probably stopped by the six-foot deep soil (the Chinese bury their dead six feet below ground). 

Live Qi of the land mass moves along the ranges of mountains and extend to hills and flat land.

However, gamma energy is more powerful: X-rays are made of gamma energy. It can travel at the speed of light and can penetrate a lot of matter. A lot of shielding is required to block it. As a decaying body emits gamma radiation, it possibly carries a unique DNA imprint of the deceased. This imprint may have a resonant effect on other similar DNA codes. That would be the living descendants who "obtained their body" or DNA from the deceased. The radiation could be "positively" charged if the burial site contains Live Qi or conversely, "negative" if Live Qi is not present. 

The Live Qi that affects the decaying deceased will radiate and the recipient will respond. This is how even the dead can influence the living. When the copper mountain of the West falls, the bronze bell in the East rings. 

An analogy was given based on historical fact. During the Han Dynasty, the huge imperial bell produced a sound for no apparent reason. The Emperor demanded an explanation. The imperial court expert predicted that a copper mountain located thousands of miles away must have collapsed due to an earthquake or volcanic eruption. Since the main mode of transportation and communication then was on horseback, it took many days for riders to verify that prediction.  

The expert explained that the bronze bell, which contained copper, picked up the vibration of like-metal as the mountain collapsed and resonated with it. 

Another analogy given was that trees grow in the spring and its nuts would germinate even if they were kept in a room without sunlight. Environmental and cosmic radiation resonance was the same within and outside a building. As the nuts and trees received the same resonance, they react accordingly although one is exposed to sunlight but not the other. Similarly, the deceased's decaying radiation can affect the surviving descendants. 

Live Qi of the land mass moves along the ranges of mountains and extend to hills and flat land. 

The higher and bigger the mountain, the greater the force it exerts downwards and sideways. This exertion of energy is inexhaustible, continuous and cumulative. Photo shows part of the Huangshan mountain range in China.

As much as there were research and studies on seismic energy of volcanic activity and tectonic plate movements, there is little or no mention of this so-called Live Qi. We know through Einstein's formula, E=mc2, that all matter contains energy. 

Land masses, similarly, have energy. We know this through our understanding of gravitational effect, which is measurable.  

The higher and bigger the mountain, the greater the force it exerts downwards and sideways. This exertion of energy is inexhaustible, continuous and cumulative. As it pushes downwards and sideways, the energy is transferred through solid matter in the mountain. 

This energy transference is conducted through matter of similar rigidity and - according to one of the Laws of Thermodynamics - from a higher energy level to a lower energy level. 

We also know that the earth generates a magnetic force that affects and influences the earth's movement. Apart from pulling and attracting ferrous metals, it also generates an electromagnetic field that can influence our daily lives. It is a proven fact that the disorientation of electromagnetic fields can affect our memory. 

As the earth spins on its axis, it also generates a centrifugal and centripetal force. A combination of centrifugal, centripetal and electromagnetic forces keeps us standing on the earth. This gravitational effect can be overcome with the right amount of force: that is what makes airplanes fly and how rockets can leave the earth�s orbit when it attains "escape velocity". 

This Live Qi energy will disperse when it is conducted into air, wind or void. Where it is contained in soil, it will be stopped by river. Rivers contain water which has a different rigidity; hence the transfer of energy will be stopped. 

Feng shui literally means wind and water. The term "Feng Shui" originates directly from this fundamental theory and is not mentioned anywhere else in ancient texts. The whole idea of Feng Shui revolves around conserving this Live Qi using our understanding of its behaviour and response to wind and water. 

Thermodynamic state 

The whole idea of feng shui is to stop, accumulate, trap and keep this Live Qi. This Live Qi is then tapped. In Yin Feng Shui, it is allowed to escape at a particular pinpoint or spot. In Yang Feng Shui, the energy is released over a bigger area.

Ancient civilisations grew along rivers, thanks to the fertility of the soil, ease of irrigation and transportation. In modern times and in cities, such applications no longer apply: no farming is done, nor are rivers used for commuting and commerce. Photo shows the old town of Huangshan in China where ancient buildings are now tourist shops.

In earth sciences, we could observe these profound phenomena in the soil and vegetation. As energy travels from high ground and high thermodynamic state to a lower level, it is usually trapped and stopped by riverbanks. As a result, nutrient levels along the riverbank are most fertile. The growth of vegetation along riverbanks exhibits this.  

The higher the mountain, the bigger and deeper the river will be. There will also be larger slopes and plains. The energy that is stopped and trapped will also be relatively higher. 

A more detailed discourse on Guo Pu's text will be unfolded gradually.  

Ancient civilisations grew along rivers, thanks to the fertility of the soil, ease of irrigation and transportation. In modern times and in cities, such applications no longer apply: no farming is done, nor are rivers used for commuting and commerce.  

They could have organically grown from the original site but these cities' prosperity could also be due to positive energies as understood in feng shui. 

As earth forces travel from the mountain ranges towards the lowlands, they are stopped, reflected, deflected trapped by rivers. Buildings can tap into this energy and be transformed into vibrant living spaces. 

 

 

We will explain how this works in the next article. 

This series on feng shui and real estate properties appear courtesy of the Malaysia Institute of Geomancy Sciences (MINGS). David Koh is the founder of MINGS and has been a feng shui master and teacher for the past 35 years. Log on to www.mingsweb.org for more details.

 
 
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